Publication Date

2014

Journal Title

Int J Surg Case Rep

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Ectopic pregnancy accounts for 1-2% of all pregnancies in the United States. The most common site of implantation for an ectopic pregnancy is the fallopian tube. We present the first case describing a recurrent ectopic pregnancy with a fetal heartbeat after ipsilateral salpingectomy that led to tubal rupture. PRESENTATION OF CASE: The patient presented with abdominal pain approximately six weeks after her last menstrual period. Seven years prior to presentation, a laparoscopic partial right salpingectomy had been performed for a tubal ectopic pregnancy. Physical exam was significant for diffuse abdominal tenderness and guarding. Ultrasonography revealed a right tubal pregnancy with a fetal pole and a fetal heart rate that was calculated to be 108 beats per minute. Free fluid was also noted. 1.5l of hemoperitoneum was subsequently evacuated and the right fallopian tube remnant with the ectopic pregnancy was removed. Pathology of the tubal remnant showed immature chorionic villi and fetal parts. DISCUSSION: The mechanism by which a recurrent ectopic pregnancy after ipsilateral salpingectomy occurs is unclear, but is theorized to be secondary to contralateral fertilization and/or tubal recanalization that may occur due to inadequate diathermy. CONCLUSION: Physicians should be aware that ectopic pregnancies may not only occur repeatedly but may also present a typically. We recommend when performing a salpingectomy that efforts be undertaken to minimize the length of the tubal remnant and to assure adequate coagulation of tissue so as to reduce the risk of recurrence.

Volume Number

7c

Pages

75-78

Document Type

Article

EPub Date

2015/01/17

Status

Faculty; Northwell Researcher

Facility

School of Medicine; Northwell Health

Primary Department

Obstetrics and Gynecology

PMID

25594734

DOI

10.1016/j.ijscr.2014.12.028


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