Title

Posttraumatic stress symptoms and smoking among World Trade Center disaster responders: A longitudinal investigation

Publication Date

2015

Journal Title

Compr Psychiatry

Abstract

PURPOSE: The current longitudinal study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity in relation to smoking abstinence and reduction over time among responders to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. METHOD: Participants were 763 police and 1881 non-traditional (e.g., construction workers) WTC responders who reported being smokers at an initial examination obtained between July 2002 and July 2011 at the WTC Health Program (WTC-HP). WTC responders were reassessed, on average, 2.5years later. RESULTS: For police WTC responders, higher levels of WTC-related PTSD symptoms at the initial visit were associated with a decreased likelihood of smoking abstinence (OR=0.98, p=.002) and with decreased smoking reduction (beta=-.06, p=.012) at the follow-up visit. WTC-related PTSD symptom severity was not related to likelihood of smoking abstinence or change in number of cigarettes smoked among non-traditional responders. Post hoc analyses suggested that for police, hyperarousal PTSD symptoms were predictive of decreased abstinence likelihood at the follow-up visit (OR=0.56, p=.006). DISCUSSION: The present findings suggest that PTSD symptoms may be differentially related to smoking behavior among police and non-traditional WTC responders in a naturalistic, longitudinal investigation. Future work may benefit from exploring further which aspects of PTSD (as compared to each other and to common variance) explain smoking maintenance.

Volume Number

63

Pages

46-54

Document Type

Article

EPub Date

2015/11/12

Status

Faculty

Facility

School of Medicine

Primary Department

Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention

Additional Departments

Medicine

PMID

26555491

DOI

10.1016/j.comppsych.2015.08.006