Title

Increasing Patient Preparedness for Sacral Neuromodulation Improves Patient Reported Outcomes Despite Leaving Objective Measures of Success Unchanged

Publication Date

2013

Journal Title

J Urol

Abstract

Purpose: We assessed how a group shared appointment influenced patient preparedness for sacral nerve stimulation for refractory overactive bladder and/or urge urinary incontinence. We also evaluated subjective and objective outcomes. Materials and Methods: Patients considering sacral nerve stimulation were prospectively enrolled and invited to attend a group shared appointment. This 75-minute presentation included a question and answer period with an implanting surgeon and an implanted patient. Control patients received standard office counseling. A patient preparedness questionnaire was completed after the group shared appointment or office counseling. Response to treatment was determined using the postoperative satisfaction questionnaire, Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) and voiding diaries. Results: In our study 36 women with a mean +/- SD age of 61 +/- 15 years underwent sacral nerve stimulation. There was no significant difference in patient demographics between the 19 women who attended the group shared appointment and the 17 controls. Overall preparedness was greater in the shared appointment group (p = 0.043) with better understanding of the purpose of (p = 0.003) and alternatives to (p = 0.043) sacral nerve stimulation. Significantly more women in the shared appointment group than controls felt completely prepared (78.9% vs 29.4%, p = 0.003) and completely satisfied (78.9% vs 35.3%, p = 0.003) with sacral nerve stimulation as well as very much better (68.4% vs 17.6%, p = 0.002) according to the PGI-I. There was no difference between the groups in the number of women with a 50% or greater symptom reduction on voiding diary. Conclusions: Participating in a group shared appointment before sacral nerve stimulation improved patient preparedness and perceived outcomes of treatment, although there was no difference in objective outcomes based on voiding diary.

Volume Number

190

Issue Number

2

Pages

594-597

Document Type

Article

Status

Faculty

Facility

School of Medicine

Primary Department

Urology

PMID

23499745

DOI

10.1016/j.juro.2013.03.025