Title

Surgical Management of Scalp Infantile Hemangiomas

Publication Date

2015

Journal Title

J Craniofac Surg

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Scalp infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are usually focal lesions that can be both disfiguring and may lead to complications such as ulceration and bleeding. The clinical features of scalp IHs have not been previously studied. This study aims to identify the clinical characteristics associated with scalp IH, the indications for surgical intervention, and results of surgical treatment. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with scalp IH presenting to a tertiary care referral center over the past 7 years. Patients' demographics, clinical features, location, and treatment course were noted. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-one of 1916 total IH patients presented with a diagnosis of scalp IH (8%). The distribution of the scalp lesions was the following: 31.8% frontal, 46.7% parietal, 7.9% occipital, and 9.9% temporal. Fifty-eight percent were solitary and 42% were multifocal lesions. The size range of scalp IH is 1 x 1 cm to 8 x 6 cm. Two percent of patients with scalp IH presented with other facial IH. Primary indications for surgery were secondary to complications such as ulceration (23.2%) and alopecia (51.7%). Surgery included elliptical excision with primary closure (85.7%) or with rotational flap closure (14.3%). The average age of surgery was 3 years (1-8 years). Most patients had a good aesthetic outcome with satisfactory hair growth. CONCLUSION: Scalp IHs are morbid tumors which often cause alopecia and/or ulceration. In our experience, many scalp IHs eventually require surgical intervention. We find that early surgical excision is beneficial, as the tissues are easily manipulated secondary to scalp/soft tissue laxity and scarring is more favorable.

Volume Number

26

Issue Number

4

Pages

1169-72

Document Type

Article

EPub Date

2015/06/17

Status

Faculty; Northwell Researcher

Facility

School of Medicine; Northwell Health

Primary Department

Pediatrics

Additional Departments

Otolaryngology

PMID

26080151

DOI

10.1097/scs.0000000000001561