Title

Injection laryngoplasty in children with cystic fibrosis and abnormal swallow

Publication Date

2015

Journal Title

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) are uniquely vulnerable to the pulmonary complications of chronic aspiration. We present a case series of children with CF and evidence of chronic aspiration who underwent injection laryngoplasty to improve the safety and efficacy of their swallow. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. SETTING: Tertiary care children's hospital. METHODS/SUBJECTS: A chart review was performed on three consecutive cases of children with CF and evidence of aspiration on modified barium swallow (MBS) evaluated at a tertiary care, academic children's medical center. RESULTS: Three patients with CF underwent injection laryngoplasty for evidence of aspiration or laryngeal penetration on MBS evaluation. Normal laryngeal anatomy was identified intraoperatively in each case. At the time of the procedure, patients were 22 months, 70 months, and 24 months old, and follow-up information was available for 7 months, 11 months, and 12 months post-procedure, respectively. Presenting symptoms included chronic cough, cough with oral liquids, and recurrent pneumonia. Each patient underwent successful injection into the interarytenoid space. Post-operatively, modified barium swallow demonstrated resolution of aspiration or penetration in all patients. No procedure-related complications were encountered. CONCLUSION: Patients with CF are highly susceptible to pulmonary infections, and aggressive treatment of chronic aspiration is often necessary. Injection laryngoplasty may be effective in normalizing swallowing in these children. Future study will elucidate the duration of effect and if this technique improves long-term pulmonary outcomes in CF patients.

Volume Number

79

Issue Number

11

Pages

1856-9

Document Type

Article

EPub Date

2015/09/15

Status

Faculty

Facility

School of Medicine

Primary Department

Otolaryngology

Additional Departments

Pediatrics

PMID

26365895

DOI

10.1016/j.ijporl.2015.08.024