Title

Murine Genetically Engineered and Human Xenograft Models of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Publication Date

January 2014

Journal Title

Seminars in Hematology

Abstract

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a genetically complex disease, with multiple factors having an impact on onset, progression, and response to therapy. Genetic differences/abnormalities have been found in hematopoietic stem cells from patients, as well as in B lymphocytes of individuals with Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who may develop the disease. Furthermore, after the onset of CLL, additional genetic alterations occur over time, often causing disease worsening and altering patient outcomes. Therefore, being able to genetically engineer mouse models that mimic CLL or at least certain aspects of the disease will help us understand disease mechanisms and improve treatments. This notwithstanding, because neither the genetic aberrations responsible for leukemogenesis and progression nor the promoting factors that support these are likely identical in character or influences for all patients, genetically engineered mouse models will only completely mimic CLL when all of these factors are precisely defined. In addition, multiple genetically engineered models may be required because of the heterogeneity in susceptibility genes among patients that can have an effect on genetic and environmental characteristics influencing disease development and outcome. For these reasons, we review the major murine genetically engineered and human xenograft models in use at the present time, aiming to report the advantages and disadvantages of each. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Volume Number

51

Issue Number

3

Pages

188-205

Document Type

Article

EPub Date

2014/07/23

Facility

School of Medicine

Primary Department

Molecular Medicine

Additional Departments

Medicine

PMID

WOS:000339641800005

DOI

10.1053/j.seminhematol.2014.05.001

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