Sex-related differences in early- A nd long-term mortality after transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement: A systematic review and meta-analysis

P. B. Parikh
T. Y. Wang
N. Sharma
S. Kort
H. A. Skopicki
L. Gruberg, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
A. Jeremias
R. P. Chikwe
J. Butler

Abstract

© 2020 HMP Communications. All rights reserved. Background. Observational data suggest that early- A nd long-term outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) differ significantly between men and women, but have demonstrated conflicting results. This study sought to examine early- A nd long-term mortality with TAVR and SAVR in women versus men. Methods. Electronic search was performed until February 2018 for studies reporting sex-specific mortality following TAVR or isolated SAVR. Data were pooled using random-effects models. Outcomes included rates of early mortality (in hospital or 30 days) and long term (1 year or longer). Results. With 35 studies, a total of 80,928 patients were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis, including 40,861 men and 40,067 women. Pooled analyses suggested considerable sex-related differences in longterm mortality following TAVR and SAVR. Following SAVR, women had higher long-term mortality (odds ratio [OR], 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.56; P<.001) and a trend toward higher early mortality (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 0.97-2.97; P=.07) compared to men. Following TAVR, women had lower long-term mortality (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.71-0.86; P<.001) and no difference in early mortality (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.96-1.23; P=.17) compared to men. Conclusions. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, women had higher long-term mortality and a trend toward higher early mortality compared to men following SAVR. Following TAVR, women had lower long-term mortality and no difference in early mortality compared with men.